It Is Done

IT IS DONEThen he said, “Write this down, for these words are trustworthy and true.” He said to me: “It is done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End.” (Revelation 21:5b-6a)

The truth and certainty of the things to come are ratified by the promise of God Himself. The subject matter of John’s vision is so great, and of such great importance to the Church and people of God that He orders it to be committed to writing as a lasting record. While John and his contemporaries could not know it, many ages would pass between the time when this vision was given and when it would be fulfilled. We are still waiting nearly two thousand years later. During this time, many great trials have intervened, providing yet another reason that God wanted it committed to writing. For the future promise has been an encouragement of His people throughout history.

God personally attests to the nature of the promise (“these words are faithful and true”) and the certainty of its fulfillment (“it is done”). God uses the past tense to assert a future fulfillment as if it were already completed. He then gives us His titles of honor (“Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end”) as a pledge or surety of the full performance.(1) Alpha and Omega are the first and last letters of the Greek alphabet. The expression is a familiar figure of speech that contrasts opposites to accentuate a unity. God is the beginning and the end, as well as everything in between those two points. He is the inception and consummation of all things.(2)

It was to His glory to begin a good work in the creation of the world and the establishment of His church. It will also be to His glory to finish the work that He began. He will not allow it to remain imperfect and unfinished. As His power and will were the first cause of all things, His pleasure and glory will be the last. Otherwise He would not be the Alpha and Omega.(3)

Up Next – The heirs and the disinherited.

______________________

References

  1. Henry, M. (1994). Matthew Henry’s commentary on the whole Bible: complete and unabridged in one volume (p. 2484). Peabody: Hendrickson.
  2. Barry, J. D., Heiser, M. S., Custis, M., Mangum, D., & Whitehead, M. M. (2012). Faithlife Study Bible (Re 1:8). Bellingham, WA: Logos Bible Software.
  3. Henry, M. (1994). Matthew Henry’s commentary on the whole Bible: complete and unabridged in one volume (p. 2484). Peabody: Hendrickson.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s