Chooses Role of Servant

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Matthew 24:45 Who then is the faithful and wise servant, whom the Master has put in charge. (NIV1978)

My Musings – When we first accept Christ our fervor to serve Him is usually high. But strangely enough, we seldom equate service with being a servant – at least not at first. Rather, we tend to think of service in terms of leadership and accomplishment. We envision
the great things we will do for Him. Being a great evangelist that leads multitudes to Christ, a great leader that fellow Christians look to for guidance and inspiration or perhaps a great teacher that unlocks deep spiritual truths for others who may not be as enlightened. But God wants us to focus less on what we will do and more on how we serve and on who we serve. For our service is not just for others, it is also for Him. And if we are willing to serve at the “lowliest” task (and sometimes that may figuratively involve washing someone else’s feet – or worse), that is great service in His eyes.

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My Advice – Jesus is looking to develop servants that are both wise and faithful who can be put in charge of the various ministries that He is calling them to fulfill. It often takes both wisdom and faithfulness to see how the role we are being called to is fitting for us. Sometimes we may think the task is below us. At other times we may feel terribly inadequate. But if we are wise, we will usually come to see how perfect the pairing (us and the task) actually was, but only if we are faithful and see the service through to completion.

Being wise involves staying ready, being alert for opportunities sweating the small stuff and taking action. Being faithful involves seeing things through to completion, even if we think that the task is below us. The true measure of faithfulness is not how much we are able to give, but by how much it costs us to give.

Be wise and faithful.

Coming Soon – An updated version of my Bible study “Got Spiritual Milk?” will soon be available in the Store link on my home page. What you see above is a short excerpt the chapter dealing with the fourth of twelve “steps” discussed in the study.

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